Dossiers
Contrary to all predictions of an era dominated by digital agorà, especially for the youngsters, the square is back as the primary place and instrument of protest. A comparative enquiry.
  • Giuliano Amato; Sheri Berman; Mohsen Kadivar, Yael Tamir, Michel Wieviorka. A panel of highly distinguished speakers closed up the last edition of the Venice Seminars organized by ResetDoc and dedicated to the highly pressing challenge of the “dehydration” of the tradional sources of democracy. In order to give the discussions held maximum circulation, the present dossier features the proceedings of the high-level roundtable chaired by Ambassador Pasquale Ferrara, making up a remarkable chorus of voices on the way forward for a true “re-birth” of democracy.
  • In the country once famous for its multiculturalism and its civil rights, today the wind seems to have changed. A new extreme right has appeared and risks changing the political landscape at the next European elections. Thierry Baudet, the leader of the Forum for Democracy, is educated, dandy, histrionic, quotes philosophers and speaks to young people and citizens. In the Dutch populist competition, it seems that Geert Wilders’ star has found a worthy competitor.
  • An “illiberal trend” is haunting Europe. And the United States. It is a virus that is eating away at our democracies, which seem ever less to resemble “Liberal Democracy.” Freedom of the press and freedom of religion are being squeezed across Europe; independent institutions are contested by political parties that enjoy significant public support. The fundamental respect for human rights is no longer the guiding principle of the democracies that emerged from the Second World War.
  • From Zuccotti Park in NYC to Tahrir Square in Cairo, occupy movements and other forms of urban protests have been powerful resistance movements against increasing inequality and marginalization as consequences of global neoliberal processes. These resistance movements also challenged the institutions of representative democracy, which have been irresponsive to the demands of the masses.
  • On 24 June 2018, both parliamentary and presidential elections were held in Turkey. With the elections, the constitutional amendments of 2017 came into force leading to a fundamental change in the nature of the political regime in Turkey towards even more authoritarian lines. Focusing on the last constitutional amendments and the recent elections, in this dossier, our contributors address a variety of issues that are critical to understanding different aspects of today’s Turkey.
  • One year and a half after the attempted coup d’état, the political and social situation in Turkey continues to be extremely critical. While the state of emergency is still in force after having been extended every three months since July 21st, 2015, the groundwork is being laid in the country, preparing for the 2019 general election which is expected to bring into force the presidential regime approved by the much-debated referendum.  
  • Six years after the 2010-2011 uprising, the so-called Arab Spring, that started in Tunisia and spread across the Arab region, the country is actually going through a difficult phase of transition to democracy. In our dossier we focus on three aspects: the political one with an analysis of Al-Nahda’s political evolution (Longo), the economical recovery (EL Houssi) and the lasting social tensions (Mbarek).
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