iraq
  • Anna Tito 1 December 2017
    Although, in many ways, the reasons for which many recently converted young men decide or have so far decided to go and fight with “God’s fanatics” in Syria and Iraq remain mysterious, those same choices made by girls born and raised in a ‘western’ environment in Europe “totally bewilders us”, admits the sociologist Farhad Khosrokhavar in his interview with Reset.
  • Ilaria Romano 25 October 2017
    It took no longer than two days to bring the territory back under the control of the Regional Government of Kurdistan at the end of 2014. In the space of 48 hours, the Iraqi army and the Hashd al-Shaabi shi’ite militia integrated into it took control of Kirkuk, it was swiftly followed by the recapture of Dibus, Makhmur, Khanaqin, Jalawla, Gwer, Bashiqa and Sinjar.
  • Chiara Cruciati 13 May 2016
    Dust, ruins and entire districts burned to the ground; that is today’s Ramadi, the Sunni city that is the capital of the very turbulent Anbar Province. Freed by the Iraqi army at the end of last year, it now looks like a ghost city. Satellite photographs published in recent days by the Associated Press show the extent of the devastation, with over three thousand buildings destroyed, 400 roads seriously damaged, bridges reduced to dust and collapsing infrastructure. About 800 civilians have died in Ramadi and the challenge faced is now a political one.
  • Lapo Pistelli interviewed by Francesco Bravi 22 August 2014
    Deputy Foreign Minister Lapo Pistelli is the Italian government’s delegate for the Middle East and in the past was a professor and OSCE representative as well as being a former member of the Italian and European parliaments’ Foreign Affairs Committees. Pistelli’s long summer started when he returned to Italy with the last flight out of Erbil before U.S. air strikes on ISIS jihadists began. There he saw first-hand Iraq’s wounded image in refugee camps, filled with those who had already abandoned everything to flee the men led by “Caliph” al-Baghdadi, and were now preparing to flee once again. Today, he believes, such an international crisis or the decision-making system in place called upon to remedy matters, are no longer issues to be addressed by desk-strategists, because when events are this harsh, a backlash can only be prevented by the United Nations’ centrality and the flexible of politics and diplomacy.
  • Antonella Vicini 15 January 2012
    “Major combat operations in Iraq have ended. In the battle of Iraq, the United States and our allies have prevailed. And now our coalition is engaged in securing and reconstructing that country.” It was May 1st 2003 when, speaking these words on board the USS Abraham Lincoln, President George W. Bush declared the end of military operations in Iraq and began to talk about security and reconstruction. So-called reconstruction soon revealed its darker aspects: car bombs and sectarian clashes, Abu Ghraib and a still impassable Green Zone surrounded by a T-wall.  
  • Bessma Momani talks to Ernesto Pagano 23 July 2010
    Political freedom but no personal freedom. In today’s Iraq there is still not room for both. According to Bessma Momani, a professor at Waterloo University and curator of the book From Desolation to Reconstruction: Iraq's troubled journey, the path to normalisation is entirely an uphill one. And, by raising the flag of decentralisation, Iraq runs the risk of losing its national identity.
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