homepage
rss
site map
about
events
links
choose language
Intercultural
Lexicon

Tolerance

After the Nineties of the 20th Century tolerance returned to the centre stage in political thought, returning to fashion a concept that has certainly been central within the framework of political thought in modern times, but that appeared to have become a closed book with the French Revolution that...

Read more

Islamism

Islamism is a highly militant mobilizing ideology selectively developed out of Islam’s scriptures, texts, legends, historical precedents, organizational experiences and present-day grievances, all as a defensive reaction against the long-term erosion of Islam’s primacy over the public...

Read more

Ethnocentrism

While empathy breaks down the barriers of borders, ethnocentrism – the supposed superiority of one’s own cultural world – is addressed at strengthening them, and if possible, at raising new ones.

Read more

Fundamentalism

Fundamentalism means the literal and dogmatic interpretation of holy texts (but these may also be secular texts), the prescriptive indications of which are considered the foundations of all action.

Read more

Relativism

Few concepts are both so controversial and recurrent within the philosophical and cultural debate as the concept of relativism.

Read more
Reset
A month of ideas.
Giancarlo Bosetti Editor-in-chief
Association for dialogue and intercultural understanding
Philosophy4freedom
IT AR Friday, 15 January 2010

«Why Teheran is out of the question»

Giuliano Amato, Giancarlo Bosetti, Ramin Jahanbegloo

Giuliano Amato, Giancarlo Bosetti and Ramin Jahanbegloo, members of Resetdoc’s scientific committee, have written a letter to UNESCO’s General Director Irina Bokova to prevent the 2010 World Philosophy Day from being hosted by Iran. Doing so would make mockery of the victims of repression, in a country where one can be imprisoned or killed for expressing one’s ideas. “We are certain that we will not be alone in our concern in presenting such an urgent appeal – the authors write – and invite philosophers and intellectuals from all over the world to join us in this by sending a message of support to info@resetdoc.org.”


To the Director General of UNESCO
Her Excellency Irina Bokova
Paris


We have recently learned that Iran is the candidate country for the 2010 World Philosophy Day, usually held in the month on November. This annual event is a worthy initiative that each year allows an intense dialogue at a global level and involves philosophers and students in ways that are new to the usual academic circuits. We have experienced this on successful occasions, when our Association, Reset-Dialogues on Civilizations, has had the honour to cooperate with UNESCO’s philosophical sector, such as in Morocco in 2006 and in Turkey in 2007.

We believe that Iran’s candidature for the coming edition should not be considered as a normal rotation of location, since we are sadly aware, due to a very close experience, how one can be imprisoned and risk one’s life in Iran because of one’s ideas. The young woman who last June became a symbol of protest after the elections, Neda Agha Soltan, held degrees in theological studies and in secular philosophy. It is certain that under current conditions a World Philosophy Day could not be held in “normal” conditions in Iran and that many philosophers would not be able to attend freely.

We are aware that a final decision has not yet been taken on Teheran’s candidature by UNESCO’s main bodies and therefore we hope that a decision will make possible that this event will take place in another country. We are certain that we are not the alone in our concern in presenting such a alarmed request and invite philosophers and intellectuals from all over the world to join us in this by sending a message of support to info@resetdoc.org.


Yours respectfully


Giuliano Amato, president of the Scientific Committee of Reset-Dialogues

Giancarlo Bosetti, editor in chief of Reset magazine

Ramin Jahanbegloo, Iranian philosopher, author of “Reading Gandhi in Tehran”

Readers' comments
Linda Lopez McAlister

As one of the founders of the International Association of Women Philosophers, I want to add my support to this request that Iran not be selected as the host country for the 2010 World Philosophy Day under the current regime there which has publicly demonstrated its contempt for the free exchange of ideas that is essential to the philosophical enterprise.

Wednesday, 5 May 2010
L.F. Segura

I disagree with the petitioners. They have already an fixed idea of what is going to be. Free interchange of ideas is always a welcomed opportunity. Turkey and Marocco were not exactly models of democracy as I suppose they understand it. I believe holding the World Philosophy Day in Iran would be a very good occasion to have a direct view of how life is in Teheran independent of the bad west press and to interchange first hand opinions with all kind of people.

Tuesday, 25 May 2010
Bruce

I strongly disagree with the very idea that a country should be "boycotted" because its government practices censorship or even imprisons and tortures people for "thought crimes." When it comes to events like "World Philosophy Day," Teheran is as good a venue as any. Let the thinkers of the world go, speak from their hearts, and share their views with the Iranians, many of whom are living in a state of cultural oppression and the threat of imprisonment. Their presence will be much appreciated as a sign of solidarity. The Cold War is over. It should be clear now that any extremist regime most fears contact between its citizens and those of the outside world; we should be facilitating such contacts, not making them more difficult. The government of Iran is not equivalent to the people of Iran. Why confuse the two? Instead of trying to isolate Iran, I recommend that signatories to this petition buy a ticket, fly to Teheran, take part, and dare to openly call attention to the oppressive practices of the "culture police" in Iran. Speaking truth to power -- when you're criticizing your host country -- isn't easy. But it can be a powerful voice for change.

Wednesday, 16 June 2010
Cameron Brown

I too withhold my support from any such boycott. Neda Agha Soltan's murder was heinous, heartbreaking and barbaric; but it was completely unrelated to her philosophical background. The letter seems to me to imply otherwise. Nevertheless, the international community of philosophers could voice its commitment to the principles for which Neda died by assembling, as she had done, in Teheran. And would not such a gesture counter, rather than reinforce, the isolation from the international community that the Iranian people suffer under the current sanctions? If the association Reset-Dialogues on Civilizations persists in its attempted boycott, its directors ought to consider a change of name.

Saturday, 21 August 2010
RC

I believe that Iran has been run over by America for far too long and should definitely be considered as a venue. Let's bring Iran back into the fold. Remember that Iran was a democracy in 1953 and was being raped for its oil by the British. The government of the kindly Mossandeq decided, after years of British not paying the agreed royalties and treating Iranian oil workers like dirt that talking with the British was a waste of effort. So the Iranian government began to nationalize their oil. Britain called on America for help and the CIA was sent in to stir up trouble and take down the democratic government of Iran. They Did. The exiled Shah of Iran was put in place by the Americans and British/American Oil became the oil company for Iran. The CIA with MOSSAD input set up SAVAK as the Secret Police for the Shah though SAVAK remained in CIA control until the Iranian Revolution of Iran. All that is remembered by the west is the hostage taking by activist students of the American embassy. They were much kinder than the CIA had been who had killed many hundreds over the years in control of Iran. They even threw activist Iranian students off of their schools' roofs to heir deaths. Having finally rid itself of the American cruel occupation by the CIA another war was brought to them with Iraq as a proxy of Reagan of the USA. A cruel war brought on by an American armed and trained Iraqi military. Even 3,000 Iranian troops were killed by one gas attack on Iranian soil. This is what America does. It's about time we began to befriend Iran and to be honest about what America has done to this beautiful country. RC

Saturday, 11 September 2010
Nadia

Bruce writes: “It should be clear now that any extremist regime most fears contact between its citizens and those of the outside world; we should be facilitating such contacts, not making them more difficult. The government of Iran is not equivalent to the people of Iran. Why confuse the two?” This is a sound argument: making Teheran the site of the 2010 World meeting could be used by participants as an opportunity for challenging the regime on the terrain precisely of freedom of expression. Yet one may still question the choice of organizing such an event in Teheran while knowing that exiled Iranian philosophers cannot attend it because risk prison. There is also a dose of presumption in the idea the conference shall be used as by world philosophers as a means for advocating the case of freedom and bringing solidarity to them. Better disassociate with the initiative.

Sunday, 12 September 2010
Nadia

Bruce writes: “It should be clear now that any extremist regime most fears contact between its citizens and those of the outside world; we should be facilitating such contacts, not making them more difficult. The government of Iran is not equivalent to the people of Iran. Why confuse the two?” This is sound argument: making Teheran the site of this year World meeting could be an opportunity for challenging the regime on the terrain precisely of freedom of expression. Yet one may still question the choice of organizing such an event in Teheran knowing that exiled Iranian philosophers cannot attend it because they risk prison. There is also a dose of presumption in the idea that world philosophers should go to Teheran in order to advocate the case of freedom and bring solidarity to them.

Sunday, 12 September 2010
Osman Deniztekin

If -say- an emigre Iranian intellectual cannot safely attend such a meeting of minds precisely because he has a mind different than Ahmedinecad's, how can any sensible person, let alone an intellectual, defend this choice of venue? (unless they can unequivocally guarantee safe passage into and out of Iran for all the participants who -once they set foot on Iranian soil- would risk persecution by the present Iranian authorities!) It is easy to pass these high-brow statements such as "the government is not equivalent to the people of Iran" while you risk nothing under the circumstances, but any Iranian dissenter very well knows that it is the government of Iran which has the power to incarcerate him/her for his/her opinion and the "people" can do nothing about it!

Monday, 13 September 2010
parisa azadinia

It is easy to distinguish between Iranian philosophers and Government. as I know the secretary of the conference(Mr Aavani) is the permanent member of FISP( Fédération Internationale des Sociétés de Philosophie). so why we should deprive people and philosophy students from this great academic opportunity. so as a student , I encourage all scholars to attend in this conference for giving Iranians , the new view to life

Wednesday, 29 September 2010
Andreas Moser

And Iran says "Thank You" to UNESCO by shutting down social science courses, among them - ironically - philosophy: http://andreasmoser.wordpress.com/2010/10/28/education-reform-iranian-style/

Friday, 29 October 2010
Write a comment

Newsletter

Sign up to receive our newsletter