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Intercultural
Lexicon

The Mediterranean

Mediterranean: literally the sea in the middle of lands, a bordering sea, and linking these lands. This characteristic makes the Mediterranean a sea that does belong to all the countries overlooking it, but to none in particular, a shared sea, not available for becoming private property..

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The Kurds

An ethnic and linguistic minority in the Near East, the Kurds now live divided between Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria, in a region unofficially known as Kurdistan, where they have always been the object of persecution and oppression.

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Christianity

Generally speaking, “Christianity” means the ensemble of churches, communities, sects, groups, but also the ideas and concepts following the preaching of he who is generally considered the founder of this religion, Jesus of Nazareth, a travelling preacher from Galilee, born between 4 B.

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Fundamentalism

Fundamentalism means the literal and dogmatic interpretation of holy texts (but these may also be secular texts), the prescriptive indications of which are considered the foundations of all action.

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Other

The process resulting in the definition of one’s own identity – hence an “us” – in an oppositional manner by, explicitly or implicitly comparing ourselves with “others”, is considered a universal movement in every society.

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Reset
A month of ideas.
Giancarlo Bosetti Editor-in-chief
Association for dialogue and intercultural understanding
Resetdoc Videos
IT Monday, 4 February 2013

Middle Eastern Turmoil: Between Spontaneity and Organization

Avishai Margalit

Many are now wondering whether organized forces in Cairo will take over the revolution, as happened a century ago when the Bolshevik fringe of Russian revolutionaries took hostage the spontaneous and plural movements, imposing its own purposes and ideology. Is this fear justified? Does this comparison with the October Revolution make sense? What instead remains of the wave of protests that swept across Israel in the summer of 2011? There too the better organised and conservative forces seem to have got the better of the spontaneity of those movements. Is it after all possible to envisage serious change without organisation? At the Istanbul Seminars held by Reset-Dialogues, in May 2012, we posed these questions to Israeli philosopher Avishai Margalit.

An interview by Nina zu Fürstenberg


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