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Intercultural
Lexicon

Ethno-psychiatry-Ethno-psychology

Ethno-psychiatry and ethno-psychology experiment the paths to be followed so as to address the cultural differences within the disciplinary wisdom and practices (western) of psychiatry and psychology.

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Islamism

Islamism is a highly militant mobilizing ideology selectively developed out of Islam’s scriptures, texts, legends, historical precedents, organizational experiences and present-day grievances, all as a defensive reaction against the long-term erosion of Islam’s primacy over the public...

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Cultural Pluralism, The Challenge of our Time

“Cultural pluralism” is a recent concept in Europe to the extent that many do not know what it means.

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Participation

It is possible to participate in a brutal event – such as gang rape, lynching, an ethnic cleansing operation – or in a humanitarian event – fund raising, collective adoption, sacrificing oneself in an exchange of prisoners..

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Ethnocentrism

While empathy breaks down the barriers of borders, ethnocentrism – the supposed superiority of one’s own cultural world – is addressed at strengthening them, and if possible, at raising new ones.

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Reset
A month of ideas.
Giancarlo Bosetti Editor-in-chief
Association for dialogue and intercultural understanding

Freedom and Democracy

Freedom and Democracy

Anti-corruption Rallies in Russia:
The Awakening of Civil Society?

Giovanna De Maio

Recent nationwide anti-corruption rallies in Russia have increased hope among many observers for a glimmer of political change. This is especially true for those who embrace a strategy to counter Russia’s information war by empowering its civil society and to push it towards demanding political transformation. Opposition leader Alexey Navalny–who organized the June 12 demonstrations and has gained increased public recognition for his documentaries on state corruption–is often painted as Russia last, best hope.


IT october 2001 - october 2011

Afghanistan, ten years of war

Antonella Vicini

Ten years have passed since the beginning of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. Reintegration and reconciliation, regionalization, security and the battle against drug trafficking are all issues still far from being resolved. At the same time, preparations are taking place for what is described as the country’s “afghanization,” with Afghanistan being returned to the Afghans. One deadline, 2014, has been established, but this is not, after all, that far off, and for now there are those, such as Malalai Joya, a former member of the Afghan parliament forced to resign after reporting the presence of new War Lords and characters linked to the Taliban inside Afghan institutions, who believe that, “after a decade, Afghanistan is still the most unstable, most corrupt and most war-torn country in the world.”


freedom and democracy

Turkey: One Year After the Coup Attempt
Erdogan has Set Up an Autocracy

Ahmet Insel

The proclamation of a state of emergency on 20 July 2016, four days after the abortive coup, paved the way for the general rule of arbitrariness. The government, by violating the limits imposed by the Constitution on the jurisdiction of the state of emergency, has since then used this exceptional power to purge massively the administration of undesirable elements and close schools, universities, newspapers, foundations and associations by simple administrative decision, without any legal procedure. 


freedom and democracy

Orbàn's illiberal policies target CEU -
Academic Freedom&Politics 1

Francesca Rolandi

Set against the backdrop of sleepy Danubian Europe, Hungary has, in recent months, returned to being at the centre of international attention. What has brought the spotlight back onto Budapest are two laws, passed one soon after the other, which have resulted in conspiracy talk of a deliberate attack on academic freedom and the world of NGOs.


freedom and democracy

Our House of Love

Ananya Vajpeyi

Once upon a time, Indians were taught to be proud of their country’s linguistic diversity, its long multicultural history, the great profusion of art and architecture, music and dance, painting and sculpture, theatre and poetry, science and mathematics, religion and philosophy – all manner of creativity that has manifested on the subcontinent from the earliest times to the present. The secular Republic of India was pitched as a big tent, under which all kinds of identities, faiths, practices, ideas and beliefs could find space and shelter, coexist, and flourish together. 


Freedom and Democracy

Colombian Peace Process: irreversible but very slow

Valeria Fraschetti

Colombia’s march towards peace is slow and slippery. The blow suffered last autumn by President Juan Manuel Santos, when the majority of Colombians rejected the Havana agreements signed with FARC’s guerrillas with a referendum, was just the first serious pitfall. 


Freedom and Democracy

What Causes the Populist Epidemic?

Daniele Archibugi e Marco Cellini

In all countries, established political parties have the dangerous propensity to counter this electoral wave of populism by adopting the issues and language used by them. Political scientists have long believed that when a country succeeds in achieving a democratic transition, creating stable institutions and accomplishing a certain level of wealth, it has a rather low risk of an authoritarian backlash.


Freedom and Democracy

Stop calling it democracy
Turkey more distant than ever from Europe

Cengiz Aktar interviewed by Azzurra Meringolo

He was one the first people to sign a petition protesting the Turkish government’s military operations against Kurdish areas in his country at the beginning of this year. Not even the attempted coup d’état of July 15th, which was neutralized by the government, has softened his criticism of President Racep Tayyp Erdogan. Cengiz Aktar, a professor of international relations at Istanbul’s Bahcesehir University, has a hard time describing his country as a democracy.


After the Dhaka Attack

Bangladesh's Deep Crisis and its Origins

Marina Forti

Only twice has Bangladesh made headline news in recent years: three years ago, when a complex of clothes factories collapsed in the suburbs of Dhaka killing over 1,200 people, and again last Friday when a group of armed men attacked a place patronised by Westerners killing 20 people, eighteen of them Westeners. The attack on the Holey Artisan Bakery, a café-restaurant in Dhaka’s most exclusive district, was not totally unexpected. There had been many signs indicating that Bangladesh, one of the poorest and most unstable countries in south Asia with 150 million inhabitants, of which the majority are Muslims, had sunk into a political crisis in which Islamist extremism is a destabilising force.


Freedom and Democracy

The Democratic Reflux. Freedom House: Democracy Decline in Many Countries

Gianni Del Panta

In the mid-1970s democracy seemed to have fallen to an all-time low. In Latin America, two of the most successful democratic stories, Uruguay and Chile, were violently overthrown by military coups in 1973, while only two years later Indira Gandhi declared a state of emergency in India, cancelling a general election and eliminating the most basic civil freedoms.


INTERNATIONAL PRESS REVIEW

The Dhaka attack: if IS now recruits among ‘wealthy’ youth

Mattia Baglieri

There is no country in the “Old Continent” left immune by the terrorist attacks carried out or at least inspired by the Islamic State, although the largest number of victims of this unusual violence is reported in Middle Eastern countries (especially in Syria, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon and Turkey) as the control of those territories conquered in the name of Jihad's ideology in Syria and Iraq is becoming harder.


Freedom and Democracy

The 2016/2017 Amnesty International Report; “The Rhetoric of Hatred Undermines Human Rights”

Ilaria Romano

Armed conflicts, civilians debased by both terrorist groups and dictatorial governments, a worrying repression of dissent and waves of populism and racism experiencing a staggering rise, are in the words of Gianni Ruffini, director of Amnesty International Italia, an indication that the world is moving backwards as far as human rights are concerned.


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